Rourke Croeser officially banned for four years

Cycling South Africa reports that mountain bike cyclist Rourke Croeser has been found guilty of two anti-doping rule violations resulting in a four year ban.

Cycling South Africa reports that mountain bike cyclist Rourke Croeser has been found guilty of two anti-doping rule violations:

  • The first anti-doping rule violation was for the presence of Recombinant EPO in an out-of-competition test conducted on 30 August 2015 in Andorra (Europe) before the Cross Country World Championships.
  • The second anti-doping rule violation was for the presence of Phentermine in an in-competition test conducted on 03 October 2015 at the Isuzu 3 Towers Stage Race in Mpumalanga.

Mr. Croeser requested that his B samples be tested in both cases and both confirmed the original findings. Mr. Croeser did not dispute the findings and charges against him. As a consequence, he was deemed to have waived the right to a hearing and the South African Institute for Drug Free Sport (SAIDS) last week issued a written decision. It found that he was guilty of both anti-doping rule violations. Mr. Croeser’s results extending back to 30 August 2015 will be disqualified, with all of the resulting consequences, including forfeiture of any medals, points and prizes.

SAIDS handed down a written decision in which it sanctioned him to a four-year ban for each of the anti-doping rule violations but they will run concurrently. The World Anti-Doping Code obliges SAIDS to make the sanctions run concurrently because the two doping infractions occurred fairly quickly after each other and before the athlete was notified of the first offence.

The four-year period of ineligibility will run from November 23, 2015 to November 22, 2019.

Mr. Croeser has been given 21 days after notification to appeal the decision.

Cycling South Africa respects the independence of the SAIDS process and will respect the outcome. Cycling SA further reiterates its zero-tolerance approach to doping in sport and will continue working with SAIDS in the promotion of a drug-free sport via its awareness and extensive testing programmes.

Yolande De Villiers handed a lifetime ban from the Cape Epic for doping

The Union Cycliste Internationale (UCI) has alerted the Absa Cape Epic to an adverse analytical finding from a sample provided by rider Yolande De Villiers during the 2015 event. The analytical report was one of three that confirmed the presence of hydrochlorothiazide (a diuretic) in her sample. As a result De Villiers was sanctioned with a period of ineligibility of 11 months from 31 January 2015 – 30 December 2015.

The Union Cycliste Internationale (UCI) has alerted the Absa Cape Epic to an adverse analytical finding from a sample provided by rider Yolande De Villiers during the 2015 event. The analytical report was one of three that confirmed the presence of hydrochlorothiazide (a diuretic) in her sample. As a result De Villiers was sanctioned with a period of ineligibility of 11 months from 31 January 2015 – 30 December 2015.

The Absa Cape Epic tightened its anti-doping rules in 2012 by introducing a lifetime ban for future offenders. The lifetime ban therefore applies to De Villiers.

The UCI ruling confirming an anti-doping rule violation results in the automatic disqualification of the results obtained in the 2015 Absa Cape Epic, where De Villiers, riding with Janka Keseg Stevkova, finished third overall.

De Villiers won the Women’s category in the 2007 Absa Cape Epic. She has completed nine of the 10 events she has started.

For further information please contact Absa Cape Epic Spokesman, Chris Whitfield on 082 457 5886 or at chris@cape-epic.com

Rourke Croeser tests positive for EPO

Cycling South Africa reports that mountain bike cyclist Rourke Croeser returned an adverse analytical finding in an out-of-competition test conducted on 30 August 2015. The analytical report confirmed the presence of Recombinant EPO in his urine sample. Mr. Croeser elected to have his B sample analysed which confirmed the result.

Cycling South Africa reports that mountain bike cyclist Rourke Croeser returned an adverse analytical finding in an out-of-competition test conducted on 30 August 2015. The analytical report confirmed the presence of Recombinant EPO in his urine sample. Mr. Croeser elected to have his B sample analysed which confirmed the result.

As per the SAIDS rules, Mr. Croeser was placed under provisional suspension as of 8 October 2015, the date on which he was notified of the adverse analytical finding. The case will now be referred to the Independent Doping Hearing Panel for hearing and adjudication.

Cycling South Africa respects the independence of the SAIDS process and will respect the outcome. Cycling SA further reiterates its zero-tolerance approach to doping in sport and will continue working with SAIDS in the promotion of a drug-free sport via its awareness and extensive testing programmes.

Mountain Biker Brandon Stewart Receives 2-Year Ban for Testosterone

The SA Institute for Drug-Free Sport (SAIDS) announced today that Mountain Biker, Brandon Stewart, has received a ban of 2 years for testing positive for the banned steroid, Testosterone. The sanctioned imposed on him is effective from 27 March 2014.

The SA Institute for Drug-Free Sport (SAIDS) announced today that Mountain Biker, Brandon Stewart, has received a ban of 2 years for testing positive for the banned steroid, Testosterone. The sanctioned imposed on him is effective from 27 March 2014.

 

Stewart tested positive for the banned substance on 7 July 2013 during an out-of-competition test.  The athlete had applied for an exemption to use Testosterone.  The exemption, known as a Therapeutic Use Exemption (TUE), was denied by the SAIDS TUE Commission.

 

Khalid Galant, SAIDS CEO, explained that subsequently Stewart appealed against his Therapeutic Use Exemption (TUE) denial to the SAIDS Appeal Board.  The appeal was not successful.  The Appeal Board supported the TUE Commission’s decision that a compelling medical condition did not exist to warrant the use of the banned steroid, testosterone.

 

Galant explains further: “Stewart was afforded due process as outlined by our anti-doping code with respect to being presented an opportunity to file an appeal against a TUE denial before he was charged with a doping offence.”

SAIDS Appeal Tribunal dismiss the appeal lodged by Brandon Stewart for the use of Testosterone

The SA Institute for Drug-Free Sport (SAIDS) announced today that the SAIDS Appeal Tribunal dismissed the appeal lodged by Brandon Stewart for the use of the banned substance Testosterone. Stewart was informed in October 2013 by Cycling South Africa that he had tested positive for the banned substance Testosterone during an out-of-competition test.

The SA Institute for Drug-Free Sport (SAIDS) announced today that the SAIDS Appeal Tribunal dismissed the appeal lodged by Brandon Stewart for the use of the banned substance Testosterone. Stewart was informed in October 2013 by Cycling South Africa that he had tested positive for the banned substance Testosterone during an out-of-competition test.

Khalid Galant, SAIDS CEO explains: “The cyclist claimed that he had a legitimate medical condition that warranted the use of Testosterone. He had previously applied for a Therapeutic Use Exemption (TUE) for the use of Testosterone. The SAIDS TUE Commission denied the application based on the international criteria that the use of the substance was elective and not medically essential.”

“The national anti-doping rules afforded the cyclist the opportunity to first lodge an appeal against the denial of his TUE, before a formal doping charge would be filed,” he added.

The appeal was heard on the 28th of January 2014 and the decision handed down on the 3rd of March 2014. The Appeal Tribunal upheld the decision of the TUE Commission to deny the therapeutic use of Testosterone.
SAIDS confirms that the provisional suspension as communicated to Brandon Stewart in correspondence sent to him on 31 October 2013, remains in place.

Galant concludes: “The athlete reserves the right to appeal the decision made by the Appeal Tribunal to the Court of Arbitration (CAS) in Switzerland and has up to the 25th of March 2014 to do so. Should Stewart forgo the last avenue for appeal, he will be charged with a doping offense and a hearing date will be set.”

Top Local Endurance Cyclist Tests Positive

Cycling SA reports that David George returned an adverse analytical finding in an out-of-competition test conducted by the South African Institute for Drug-Free Sport (SAIDS) on 29 August 2012.

George is therefore provisionally suspended with immediate effect from competing in any event. The SAIDS process will now take its course.

Cycling South Africa respects the independence of the SAIDS process and will respect the outcome. Cycling SA further reiterates its zero-tolerance approach to doping in sport and confirms that there is no evidence of this being an endemic problem in the sport in South Africa.

Cycling SA reports that David George returned an adverse analytical finding in an out-of-competition test conducted by the South African Institute for Drug-Free Sport (SAIDS) on 29 August 2012.

George is therefore provisionally suspended with immediate effect from competing in any event. The SAIDS process will now take its course.

Cycling South Africa respects the independence of the SAIDS process and will respect the outcome. Cycling SA further reiterates its zero-tolerance approach to doping in sport and confirms that there is no evidence of this being an endemic problem in the sport in South Africa.

Contador linked to blood transfusion

A urine sample taken from three-time Tour de France winner Alberto Contador showed abnormally high levels of plastic residues that could indicate he received a transfusion of his own blood during this year’s race, a person with knowledge of the test results told The Associated Press on Tuesday.

Contador, who has previously denied receiving a transfusion, was provisionally suspended by the international cycling federation last week after a small amount of the banned drug clenbuterol was discovered in one of his samples by a laboratory in Cologne, Germany.

Image courtesy Denis Doyle\Getty Images

A urine sample taken from three-time Tour de France winner Alberto Contador showed abnormally high levels of plastic residues that could indicate he received a transfusion of his own blood during this year’s race, a person with knowledge of the test results told The Associated Press on Tuesday.

Contador, who has previously denied receiving a transfusion, was provisionally suspended by the international cycling federation last week after a small amount of the banned drug clenbuterol was discovered in one of his samples by a laboratory in Cologne, Germany.

Contador has been provisionally suspended by the UCI and will lose his Tour de France title if he is convicted of doping. He also risks a two-year suspension.

Alberto Contador says he may quit cycling if he is banned for doping.

“If this is not resolved favourably and in just fashion then I would have to consider whether I would ever get back on a bike,” Contador told Spanish broadcaster Telecinco.

Margarita Fullana suspended for doping

Three times world champion and Olympic cycling medallist Margarita Fullana of Spain has been provisionally suspended after testing positive to banned blood-booster erythropoietin (EPO).

The International Cycling Union (UCI) announced the ban on Saturday, dealing a further blow to the sport’s battered image.

Three times world champion and Olympic cycling medallist Margarita Fullana of Spain has been provisionally suspended after testing positive to banned blood-booster erythropoietin (EPO).

The International Cycling Union (UCI) announced the ban on Saturday, dealing a further blow to the sport’s battered image.

The suspension had been handed down after a WADA-accredited laboratory in Montreal reported an “adverse analytical finding of EPO” in a urine sample collected in an out-of-competition test on August 30, the UCI said in a statement.

“The provisional suspension of Ms Fullana remains in force until a hearing panel convened by the Spanish Cycling Federation determines whether she has committed an anti-doping rule violation under Article 21 of the UCI Anti-Doping Rules,” the statement said.

“Ms Fullana has the right to request and attend the analysis of her B sample. Under the World Anti-Doping Code and the UCI Anti-Doping Rules, the UCI is unable to provide any additional information at this time.”

The 38-year-old Fullana won bronze in the cross-country cycling at the 2000 Sydney Olympics and is a three-time winner at the mountain bike world championships.

Alberto Contador was also recently provisionally suspended for testing positive for a banned drug called clenbuterol. On the very same day, two more Spaniards were tested positive for hydroxyethyl. Ezequiel Mosquera and team-mate David Garcia Da Pena tested positive for the banned drug.