Team Giant’s Rohan Du Plooy takes the win at a wet Medihelp Stellenbosch Cycle Tour

 Team Giant’s Rohan Du Plooy took the win at the Medihelp Stellenbosch Cycle Tour this morning in wet racing conditions, finishing the 97km route in 02:16:14, beating Craig Boyes (Specialized) and Dan Craven (Namibia) to the post, who finished in second and third respectively.

Team Giant’s Rohan Du Plooy won the Stellenbosch Cycle Tour in the Western Cape today. Photo: Dan Edwards 

 

Team Giant’s Rohan Du Plooy took the win at the Medihelp Stellenbosch Cycle Tour this morning in wet racing conditions, finishing the 97km route in 02:16:14, beating Craig Boyes (Specialized) and Dan Craven (Namibia) to the post, who finished in second and third respectively.

Liezel Jordaan (Route 62 Cycles) claimed the victory in the women’s race in a time of 02:31:35. Second and third were Katie Lennard (02:31:36) and Lucy James (02:31:38) respectively.

Du Plooy said the pace was fast right from the beginning with attacks taking place throughout the race. There was a break away at Val de Vie and with the help of his team mates Du Plooy was able to successfully drive to the finish.

Jordaan explained that the women’s race was a bit different with the women sticking in a bunch for most of the race and a sprint to the finish taking place right near the end.

Over five thousand cyclists lined up on a wet Sunday morning in Stellenbosch to take part in the second biggest road race in the Western Cape and the final premier seeding event for the 2018 Cape Town Cycle Tour.

Director of Marketing, Media and Sponsorship for the Cape Town Cycle Tour Trust, organisers of the Medihelp Stellenbosch Cycle Tour, David Bellairs said, “Despite the weather conditions prevailing on the day, a large number cyclists turned out for the Medihelp Stellenbosch Cycle Tour. Our thanks goes out to the intrepid cyclists who braved the rain to participate in the 2017 edition. To our sponsors, Medihelp, on behalf of the cyclists and organisers thank you for a great event.”

Heyn van Rooyen, Medihelp Medical Scheme’s Principal Officer says, “It’s a privilege for the Scheme to be associated with a challenging race and meeting of like-minded health conscious participants who share Medihelp’s passion for a healthy lifestyle.”

  

97km Race Results

Elite Men 1st: Rohan Du Plooy (Team Giant) (02:16:14)

Elite Men 2nd: Craig Boyes (Specialized) (02:16:38)

Elite Men 3rd: Dan Craven (Namibia) (02:17:01)

Elite Ladies 1st: Liezel Jordaan (Route 62 Cycles) (02:31:35)

Elite Ladies 2nd: Katie Lennard (The Gear Change) (02:31:36)

Elite Ladies 3rd: Lucy James (02:31:38)

Team Active Bodies wins 25th Coronation Double Century in record time

 The team of Active Bodies won the 2017 Coronation Double Century over 202km in a new record time of 04:30:12.

 

“That’s what we came here to do,” commented a visibly elated Clint Hendricks after the finish.

“I don’t know why I keep doing it,” he added. “it’s always really tough.”

 The team of Active Bodies won the 2017 Coronation Double Century over 202km in a new record time of 04:30:12.

 

“That’s what we came here to do,” commented a visibly elated Clint Hendricks after the finish.

“I don’t know why I keep doing it,” he added. “it’s always really tough.”

 

Alfa Bodyworks, the 2016 runners-up, featuring Nolan Hoffman, Shaun-Nick Bester, HB Kruger and Shameeg Salie finished second in a time of 4:38:48, with Team Mad Macs pb häzz– who rode a surprisingly spectacular race – rounding off the podium.

 

The men’s race in the world’s largest team time trial lived up to the pre-race hype with all the big guns going hard from the start. Alfa Bodyworks looked like early favourites. However, they, along with Freewheel Cycology Racing and Hot Chillee seemed to hemorrhage riders early on, due to punctures and early fatigue. They however managed to keep it together to have the required six of their 12 riders finish, but it was Active Bodies who was ahead at every time check. 

 

According to Hendricks the team – which included African Champion Willie Smit and captained by Bradley Potgieter – rode faster in 2017 despite not having as many ‘name’ pros. “We were a lot smoother than last year. We had 11 guys until about 25km to go and only lost guys because of the punctures.”

 

Conditions were perfect for racing early on, cloudy and cool through Buffeljagsrivier and up into Tradouw Pass, the first real test of the route, however temperatures soon became an issue as riders got onto the R62.

 

It was hot and windy,” Hendricks said, definitely hotter and windier than last year – it was just a long, hard grind and its going to be a long day for the back markers,” he concluded.

 

The women’s category was dominated by pre-race favourites, Tiletoria Train. The team, including Bianca Holtzkampf, Hazel MacGill, Susan Melmed, Maroesjka Matthee and Desiree Strydom never held back and had a healthy lead at all of the check points.

 

The hotly contested Mixed division was taken out by Design in Motion, with Hotchillee Mixed in second. Design in Motion came with some serious firepower, featuringCashandra Slingerland, Desray Sebregts, pro riders Myles van Musschenbroek and Richard Baxter.

 

Aside from the unique competitive nature of the racing element, the event is a favourite on the calendar among fun riders – for who it really caters. The camaraderie, scenery and big endurance challenge is what draws them, with the post-race carnival atmosphere in town the perfect way to finish it off.

 

This is our 11th year with the Double Century,” commented Coronation portfolio manager, Neville Chester, who once again completed the race himself. We love the event, it really is a signature event, I don’t think there is anything quite like it – in terms of the distance and nature – in the country,” he said. 

 

“The team nature of the event also ties in with Coronation’s philosophy of teamwork. It was a fantastic day out there,” he said of his ride. “It was a beautiful day with the weather really playing along. There was also a great vibe out on route and, like all good teams, I managed to surround myself with people who made me look good.”

 

The Coronation Double Century is a Pedal Power Association event organised by the Cape Town Cycle Tour Trust on their behalf. For event-related queries, please contact the Events Office on 087 820 7223 during office hours.

 

RESULTS:

Men

1Active Bodies 04:30:12

2. Alpha Bodyworks 4:38:48

3. Mad Macs pb häzz 4:40:24

 

Women

1. Tiletoria Train 5:38:45

2. Peak Peloton 7:09:13

3. RoadCover WCT 7:51:11

 

Mixed

1. Design in Motion Storck 5:04:41

2. Hot Chillee Mixed 5:08:18

3. Laurium 5:20:44

Who to watch at the Coronation Double Century 2017 this weekend

If it’s November, and it’s cycling, it must be Coronation Double Century time. For the majority of the 3 200 riders, this 202km team event is a test of endurance and friendship, but for a few teams, it is all about the win.

If it’s November, and it’s cycling, it must be Coronation Double Century time. For the majority of the 3 200 riders, this 202km team event is a test of endurance and friendship, but for a few teams, it is all about the win.

 

The seeding system the event uses ensures the slowest teams start first (at an eyelid-cracking 5am), and the potential winners two-and-a-half hours later. So everyone gets to see the pros power by.

 

Who should we be looking out for?

 

The Men’s race should boil down to a five-horse gallop, if the seeding indices are to be believed. The bookies’ favourites will surely be the Active Bodies outfit, with the likes of African Champion Willie Smit, 2016 Cape Town Cycle Tour winner Clint Hendricks and a handful of other top pros lining up alongside the 2016 runners-up, Alfa Bodyworks. This Cape-based team has another Cycle Tour champ, Nolan Hoffman, headlining with fellow pros Shaun-Nick Bester, HB Kruger and Shameeg Salie in the ranks, but comes with possibly a little more strength in depth, and rode pretty much as-is last year. In this event, team work is critical, so that could be a deciding factor, something the other top-five shoo-ins will be looking to capitalise on in the absence of World-Tour firepower: Hotchillee (Dan Halksworth, Luthando Kaka, Luke Hardiman), Bluff Meat Supply (Andreas Studer, Sean Merredew) and Freewheel Cycology (Christoff van Heerden, Shan Wilson, Jarryd Hayley, James Tennent and Charles Keey, with a guest rider who might look startlingly like Olympic Omnium Gold Medallist Elia Viviani) will be hoping for perfect tactics and the best of luck as they take on the big-name teams. One slip-up, though and there is a full peloton of challengers in the wings: The Misfits, Demacon, 04:55 Club, Proconics ASG and Mad Macs pb häzz will all be ready to pounce.

 

The Women’s division is sure to be dominated by the Tiletoria Train. Bianca Holtzkampf, Hazel MacGill, Susan Melmed, Maroesjka Matthee and Desiree Strydom lead a team of experienced CDC riders, and with the majority of the established names on the women’s racing circuit being absorbed into the highly-competitive Mixed category, they will surely triumph over the Road Cover outfit.

 

The Mixed trophy is often more hotly contested than the Men’s, as team sponsors seek the best value out of what has become one of South Africa’s premier road events. 2017 will be no different, with Design in Motion, Hotchillee Mixed and RRAV dicing for the win, closely watched by the Enervit and Edenglen outfits (if our seeding gurus have pushed the right buttons). Design in Motion carries some serious firepower; a resurgent Cashandra Slingerland, Desray Sebregts and Sam Sanders will be joined by pro riders Myles van Musschenbroek and Richard Baxter, as well as a gaggle of Joburg hardmen. Will they have enough to hold off the might and class of former Paris-Roubaix winner Magnus Backstedt, ably assisted by Lise Bryer, Nadia Visser, Catherine and Alma Colyn, Lucy James and a small group of Cape Town’s bravest vet riders? We shall see. They, in turn, will need to watch for the RRAV squad, which has some particularly strong male riders to support the likes of Zanri Rossouw, Elmari de Wet and Janice Venter. Team Enervit has a more rounded look to it – with all 12 riders similar in seeding, in support of Tess Mackeurtan, Sam Kristiansen and Natalie Bounds, as does the Edenglen squad, with Chiara di Siena, Vivien Sa Joe, Lauren Walker and Adele Ambrose looking to some top team work to keep them in the hunt.

 

The Coronation Double Century differs from a ‘normal’ road race in that a team’s time is decided by the sixth rider to cross the finish line. Factor in the Charles Milner Medal, which is awarded to each full team of 12 riders that finishes within 10 minutes of the team’s first rider (inside the allocated 10 and a half hours), and even at the sharp end of the field it is tough to call; many squads opt for the full-finish rather than sacrificing a rider to finish a few minutes faster. This shouldn’t affect the podium contenders, who will burn out the workers in the search for glory, but there are a few teams who will be giving it a full go for a competitive 12-rider finish.

Davids achieves career first with Jock Tour title

The in-form Brendon Davids achieved a career first when he raced to victory in the three-day Bestmed Jock Tour, which culminated at the Mbombela Stadium in Mpumalanga today.

The in-form Brendon Davids achieved a career first when he raced to victory in the three-day Bestmed Jock Tour, which culminated at the Mbombela Stadium in Mpumalanga today.

 

The RoadCover pro finished the 138km final stage, which included 3 100m of ascent, in third to cement his overall lead in what is, on paper, South Africa’s toughest road cycling event.

 

Stage three was won by ProTouch’s James Fourie with Dimension Data’s Kent Main, who wore the yellow jersey yesterday after winning the opening day individual time-trial, in second.

 

ProTouch’s Jayde Julius finished runner-up in the general classification after a gutsy long-distance attack that saw him take the honours in yesterday’s 154km stage over Spitskop and Long Tom Pass.

 

Completing the overall podium was his teammate Myles van Musschenbroek, who has been on top of his game after returning from injury earlier this month.

 

“I’m happy with how this weekend turned out, it’s a really cool feeling,” said Davids, a former African continental mountain bike champion who switched to the road after missing out on selection for the Rio Olympics.

 

“It’s my first tour win, the first time I’ve worn a yellow jersey on the road, so I’m pretty happy with how things have turned out,” said the 23-year-old from Fourways in Johannesburg.

 

He explained that he had started the stage with the sole intention of holding on to the yellow jersey, which he secured the previous day after just failing to haul in a tiring Julius.

 

The final day included the feared Boulders climb early on, but it was status quo for the GC contenders until they hit the base of the Hilltop ascent after 131km of racing.

 

Team ProTouch showed their hand first on the climb when Pieter Seyffert and Gustav Basson tried to set Julius up for a final assault on yellow, but Davids was content to follow the wheels of Main and teammate Mornay van Heerden.

 

RoadCover’s Clint Hendricks then paced Davids up to the three attackers, with Main on Davids’ wheel. Job done, Hendricks peeled off, leaving Davids and Main to continue the uphill battle.

 

“Pieter and Gustav had gone too deep so they left Jayde isolated and it was just him, Kent and myself from there,” said Davids.

 

“Halfway up, I attacked on one of the switchbacks and only Kent really responded. Jayde laboured onto the wheel and I knew the next move would be the one that would give us the gap.”

 

The former teammates duly disposed of Julius only to realise there was one more hurdle to clear.

 

“With two kilometres to go we realised there was another rider up the road,” said Davids. “I completely buried myself to try and get within a winning distance, but it was too little too late.”

 

The new champion said he was waiting for a visa to come through to race overseas and was only able to confirm his entry a few days before the start.

 

“I had a big week of training coming into the tour so, to be honest, I didn’t think I’d have as good a time-trial as I did. I thought we’d ride for Mornay if he had a good opening stage.

 

“But one thing led to another and my legs continued to do well.”

 

Julius’ attacking riding saw him take both the Optimum Financial Services king of the mountains and points jerseys.

 

Demacon’s overnight leader Carla Oberholzer won her second stage in a row to secure overall victory in what she termed as “probably the most difficult road tour in South Africa”.

 

Stage one winner Yolandi du Toit, riding for Garmin, minimised her losses to take second ahead of former national road champion Cherise Willeit.

 

Oberholzer, from Clarens in the Free State, was part of a three-woman sprint for the finish after she and Bestmed-ASG’s Sanet Coetzee formed an early breakaway a mere 3km after the start.

 

They were joined by Willeit, Lynette Burger, Zanri Roussouw, Du Toit and Daleen van der Leek soon after Boulders and the group stayed together until Hilltop.

 

“We got a decent gap on the others on Hilltop and rolled together until the finish, where we sprinted it out,” said Oberholzer.

 

The 32-year-old said the overall victory had been her objective and she was extremely happy with the outcome.

 

“The main goal today was to keep the lead and anything we took on top of that was a bonus. It’s always great when you pull something like this off with great teamwork.”

 

Bestmed’s marketing executive Chris Luyt announced that the medical scheme would donate R200 for every member who completed the Jock Tour, split equally among Cansa and Helping Hands, a corporate social investment driven by Clicks.

 

Provisional results

 

Stage 3

 

Men

 

  1. James Fourie4:01:25
  2. Kent Main4:01:57
  3. Brendon Davids4:01:57
  4. Jayde Julius4:02:26
  5. Thando Zothe4:02:57
  6. Gustav Basson4:03:12
  7. Gregory de Vink4:03:38
  8. Ben Melt Swanepoel4:03:52
  9. Ricardo Broxham4:03:55
  10. Myles van Musschenbroek4:09:29

 

Women

 

  1. Carla Oberholzer4:59:28
  2. Yolandi du Toit4:59:29
  3. Cherise Willeit4:59:31
  4. Dalene van der Leek5:01:14
  5. Zanri Rossouw5:01:57
  6. Lynette Burger5:03:16
  7. Sanet Coetzee5:03:36
  8. Susan Melmed5:22:00
  9. Kristen Louw5:22:00
  10. Zanele Tshoko5:24:13

 

Overall

 

Men

 

  1. Brendon Davids9:10:50
  2. Jayde Julius9:12:44
  3. Myles van Musschenbroek9:18:22

 

Women

 

  1. Carla Oberholzer11:35:37
  2. Yolandi du Toit11:40:12
  3. Cherise Willeit11:49:33

EXCITING ANNOUNCEMENT FOR THE 2018 CAPE TOWN CYCLE TOUR

At a press briefing today, it was announced that the start for the 2018 Cape Town Cycle Tour will move from its traditional position on Hertzog Boulevard to the historic Grand Parade Precinct.

At a press briefing today, it was announced that the start for the 2018 Cape Town Cycle Tour will move from its traditional position on Hertzog Boulevard to the historic Grand Parade Precinct.

 

“Our participants’ safety will always come first,” says David Bellairs, a Director of the Cape Town Cycle Tour Trust. “2017 was a year of incredible learnings. We believe now – as we did then – that the right decision was made on the day. Nothing could have prepared the team for the challenges thrown at us in the lead up to the 2017 Cape Town Cycle Tour and nobody was more disappointed at the cancellation than the team who had spent the entire year preparing for the 40th Cape Town Cycle Tour.  After the issues we had with wind at this year’s start, we immediately reviewed and re-assessed our options for 2018.”

 

“We needed to be responsive in respect of this year’s challenges and look to mitigate the wind risk.  We realise that there are very few areas in Cape Town that are immune to the Cape Doctor, but believe with this move that at least participants will not again be subjected to the sort of wind vortices created by the tunnels at the base of the civic center, these being exacerbated by the extraordinarily strong winds prevailing on the morning of this year’s event. An extensive amount of work has gone into understanding and looking into risk mitigation procedures and we are in the process of revising our wind guidelines as they relate to the start, route and finish precinct. This is being done in conjunction with Disaster Management Services, City of Cape Town, Pedal Power Association and experts in the meteorological field.”

 

Bellairs continues: “We are very grateful for the upgrades and rejuvenation that the City of Cape Town has already undertaken, and has planned for the Grand Parade Precinct. Following discussions with all stakeholders and particularly our partners at The City of Cape Town, we have made the decision to move the start to the Grand Parade Precinct. The Cape Town Cycle Tour is an iconic event – and the Grand Parade, overlooked by City Hall with the backdrop of Table Mountain, is a globally iconic event venue. The City effectively enticed us back to our ‘routes’:  in 1978, 525 cyclists set off from the roads outside the castle on the first ever Cycle Tour (then called The Argus Tour).

 

City of Cape Town Mayoral Committee Member for Safety and Security; and Social Services, Alderman JP Smith, said, “The City of Cape Town is proud to host next year’s Cape Town Cycle Tour, which has become one of the highlights on the city’s events calendar. This prestigious race is the world’s largest individually timed cycle tour, and takes participants along some of Cape Town’s most picturesque and scenic routes.

While the start of the race changes in 2018, we look forward to welcoming organisers and cyclists to an exciting event. Our support of the Cape Town Cycle Tour forms part of our strategy to attract even more events to the city. We hope our visitors and resident cyclists enjoy the race and natural beauty of the Cape.

The City of Cape Town remains committed to doing all we can to promote cycling and to ensure a safe environment for cyclists on our roads.”

 

Bellairs continues “The Grand Parade Start Precinct will broaden the scope for expansion and improving the overall Cycle Tour experience for participants. A more consolidated precinct will enable us to create a more welcoming environment at the start with the possible inclusion of a breakfast hospitality zone and a more expansive offering of services. Space constraints in Hertzog Boulevard mitigated against such improvements. The move will also free up the central MyCiti bus station located at the Civic Centre.”

 

 

On Sunday, 11 March 2018, riders will gather on the historic Grand Parade and line up in Castle Street alongside the Castle of Good Hope and will follow the usual route around the Peninsula to the finish.

 

Changes are also in the pipeline for the race village at Green Point, which will see a substantial new offering to both corporate and general entrants.

Moolman-Pasio ready for Giro Rosa

South African cycling superstar, Ashleigh Moolman-Pasio has proven that passion, hard work and dedication does not go unrewarded. Last week, she was ranked third in the Elite Women UCI Individual World Rankings, the highest ever for any South African woman cyclist.

South African cycling superstar, Ashleigh Moolman-Pasio has proven that passion, hard work and dedication does not go unrewarded. Last week, she was ranked third in the Elite Women UCI Individual World Rankings, the highest ever for any South African woman cyclist. Photo: Stuart Pickering/Cycling Direct

 

South African cycling superstar, Ashleigh Moolman-Pasio has proven that passion, hard work and dedication does not go unrewarded. Last week, she was ranked third in the Elite Women UCI Individual World Rankings, the highest ever for any South African woman cyclist.

In 2014, Moolman-Pasio won the bronze medal at the Glasgow Commonwealth Games, and then in 2015 she escalated her position in the Elite Women UCI Individual World Rankings to sixth place, then the highest ranking from any woman rider in the country. Since the end of April 2017, she has had a string of successes, including Festival Elsy Jacobs where she finished third in the General Classification (GC) in the three-stage event; winner of the five-stage Emakumeen Bira; winner of the two back-to-back French one-day races Classique Morbihan and the Grand Prix de Plumelec; and finished seventh in the GC of the five-stage Ovo Energy Women’s Tour.

When chatting about her achievement, she said: “Being ranked third in the world is very special. To be absolutely honest, it’s not something that I expected this year especially after the injury I sustained in October last year.”

Moolman-Pasio, who races for the Cervelo-Bigla Pro Cycling Team, was off her bike for a great while last year whilst she recovered from a nasty crash in which she broke her hip. “I really didn’t set any goals, although an objective before the crash would’ve been to continue to climb the world rankings’ ladder,” she said.

In talking about what she has learnt from not over-committing to a specific target, she said: “Sometimes it’s when you’re not really aiming for something that it comes your way. And that’s often because you’re not pushing for it.

“Sometimes we push too hard as athletes and we make certain goals too big in our lives. It can become overwhelming and because of the nature of the sport we cannot control our circumstances. There are so many uncontrollable elements in terms of tactics, injuries, punctures, mechanicals, and crashes on the day of the race.

“I think it’s when you just embrace the journey and go with the flow and allow things to happen and to take their course – that’s when I feel things generally really come together. I think that is what I’m experiencing right now.”

It feels extra special for Moolman-Pasio to be at a world number three coming from South Africa and the African continent. She mentioned that the Europeans have a greater advantage because of the cycling hub that Europe is.

“To be able to continue to live in your home country and to race at the highest level is much easier than for those of us who are trying to do it from the southern hemisphere and particularly from South Africa and Africa,” she said.

The public often only see the brighter side, successes and outcomes of the racing lifestyle, but Moolman-Pasio described some of the hardships and how she deals with them. “As athletes, we share the positive moments on social media platforms. It looks like we’re living the dream, and I am living the dream, but it’s not always as dreamy as it might appear. The life of a pro cyclist is challenging and like everything else in life, also has its down side. Of course I absolutely love my job and that’s what makes it possible for me to continue to push through the hard times. And then sometimes, we get to experience the successes and limelight that people see in the media.”

Mooman-Pasio mentioned the unwavering support she receives in every aspect of her career from her husband Carl, which often gets her through the tougher times.

Having overcome some pretty serious injuries, she said that the mental aspect of having to pick herself up every time something went wrong is never easy. “I must say, what has made it easier for me to continue journeying to get to this point is faith and a sense of purpose.

“For me that purpose is to be able to inspire others and to be able to share the life lessons and obstacles and challenges and successes with the hope that it all will inspire someone else to pick themselves up when they’re feeling low or to set themselves a goal to find their dream and to pursue it,” she said.

Moolman-Pasio concluded with some advice for aspiring athletes: “Find your passion in life and pursue it, because if you really love what you’re doing you’ll be able to overcome the obstacles and reach your true potential. Having said that, of course it is important to dream, but it is also very important to set realistic goals. If at any point you feel that the goals are becoming completely out of reach, then there’s no shame in stepping back, reassessing and re-determining whether that is your real purpose or passion. Or is there something else that you could be doing?”

*Ashleigh Moolman-Pasio will be competing in the 2017 Giro d’Italia Internazionale Femminile, which gets underway from 30 June to 9 July 2017. The high profile event is the only Grand Tour in women’s cycling. The 10-day race begins in Aquileia with an 11.5-kilometre Team Time Trial. At 25 June 2017, Ashleigh was ranked fifth in the Elite Women UCI Individual World Rankings.

Main wins Tour of Good Hope in sensational finish

RoadCover’s Kent Main ticked a significant item off his bucket list when he was crowned Bestmed Tour of Good Hope champion in a sensational finale at the Taal Monument near Paarl today.

RoadCover’s Kent Main ticked a significant item off his bucket list when he was crowned Bestmed Tour of Good Hope champion in a sensational finale at the Taal Monument near Paarl today.

In one of the tightest finishes to any road tour in South Africa, Main powered his way up the steep climb to make up a 51-second deficit on Pro Touch’s overnight leader Myles van Musschenbroek to snatch the title by a single second.

It was an agonising outcome for the 24-year-old Van Musschenbroek, made more excruciating by a wait of about 15 minutes before the timekeepers were able to confirm the final standings.

Main ultimately clocked an overall time of 8:31:22 over four stages after the penultimate stage was cancelled due to extreme winds yesterday. His teammate Eddie van Heerden completed the podium in 8:32:22.

After forcing his way into overall contention with a fourth-place finish in Tuesday’s individual time-trial, Van Musschenbroek put in a desperate effort to protect his lead up the final climb, but Main’s power on the hills ultimately made the difference.

Stage honours went to Dimension Data’s defending champion Stefan de Bod after he also won Tuesday’s Buffet Olives time-trial, followed by teammate Joseph Areruya. Main took third place on the day.

Afterwards the 21-year-old Main, from Linden in Johannesburg, said he felt the first major victory of his career was a result of a more structured programme he implemented last year.

“With the help of my brother I set up a plan halfway through last year aimed at training for this tour, but I always knew it would be hard to win.

“I have often said to my mates this is one of my favourite races and one I always wanted to win. Now that it’s happened, I’m really happy and it will boost my career going forward.”

He paid tribute to his Johannesburg rival, who fought all the way to protect his overnight lead.

“Myles was able to manage everything that came his way today and his team looked after him really well.

“We could not have done more to attack him and to eventually win it by one second is more than I could have hoped for.”

Van Musschenbroek, who lives in Rosebank in Johannesburg and works full time, was exhausted by his final effort and said he “was seeing stars and felt dizzy” at the end.

“Our team has never been in this situation so from the start it was a learning experience. But my teammates rode perfectly to control the race.

“I was a bit stressed out during the stage, probably from putting pressure on myself, and I gave it absolutely everything I could on the last climb.

“But Kent put up a great fight. It was fantastic for the race and he deserves the win.”

Main also won the King of the Mountain competition, with Alfa Bodyworks’ Irish import Philip Lavery taking the points competition.

Candace Lill of dormakaba claimed the women’s title by finishing fourth on the stage to comfortably protect the two-minute lead she had going into the final day.

British rider Chanel Mason and Bestmed-ASG’s An-Li Kachelhoffer had an intense duel for the stage honours on the climb up to the Taal Monument, with Mason just outlasting her rival. Team Spur’s Ariane Luthi finished third.

Lill took the title in 10:46:48, followed by Mason in 10:48:41 and Kachelhoffer in 10:49:50.

The overnight leader, from Sun Valley in Cape Town, said she went into the stage with her priority being to defend the yellow jersey and that she had to contend with some attacking racing throughout the stage.

“The women really gave it their all today – I know there were five seconds between third and fourth so people were fighting for the podium,” said the 25-year-old.

“I think that’s great. That’s the sort of aggressive racing we want to see in women’s cycling.”

Lill said the final climb had been a real test for the riders.

“This climb has everyone on their limits and it’s just a matter of hanging in there until the end.”

With a strong background in mountain biking, she was delighted to secure her first win in a road racing event.

“I’m so happy I came out on top, but I think in a way I was quite surprised.

“Obviously I’m training for the Cape Epic so I’m fit. To win a road race was a big accomplishment for me and this was a good test.”

Results and general classification:

Stage 5

86.7km
La Paris Estate to Taal Monument, Paarl

Elite men results

1 Stefan de Bod 2:03:13
2 Joseph Areruya 2:03:28
3 Kent Main 2:03:30

Elite men GC

1 Kent Main 8:31:22
2 Myles van Musschenbroek 8:31:23
3 Eddie van Heerden 8:32:22

King of the Mountains: Kent Main

Elite women results

1 Chanel Mason 2:46:22
2 An-Li Kachelhoffer 2:46:23
3 Ariane Luthi 2:46:38

Elite women GC

1 Candice Lill 10:46:48
2 Chanel Mason 10:48:41
3 An-Li Kachelhoffer 10:49:50

Men 30+ GC

1 Jaco Cronje
2 Neil Timm
3 Franco Ferreira

King of the Mountains: Jaco Cronje

Men 40+ GC

1 Thys Oosthuizen
2 Johan Naude
3 Jamie Anderson

King of the Mountains: Jamie Anderson

Men 50+ GC

1 Paul Kraus
2 Douglas Burger
3 Shane Daniel

King of the Mountains: Douglas Burger

Janse van Rensburg and De Bod celebrate team victory

Crowds and supporters of the Mens Road Races could not have asked for more glorious weather on the last day of the South African National Road Championships. The riders did face some wind on the course, but that came as no surprise to the Cape Town conditions, and those at the finish line witnessed Dimension Data for Qhubeka’s Reinhardt Janse van Rensburg alongside teammate and under-23 Winner Stefan de Bod to claim the Elite Men’s race on Sunday 12 February.

Crowds and supporters of the Mens Road Races could not have asked for more glorious weather on the last day of the South African National Road Championships. The riders did face some wind on the course, but that came as no surprise to the Cape Town conditions, and those at the finish line witnessed Dimension Data for Qhubeka’s Reinhardt Janse van Rensburg alongside teammate and under-23 Winner Stefan de Bod to claim the Elite Men’s race on Sunday 12 February.

The 14-lap, 179.5-kilometre race began with the usual early tactics and attempts at breaks from the bunch, but the first real move of the day was that of Jacques Janse van Rensburg, Willie Smit, Carl Pasio, Ed Greene, Calvin Beneke and David Maree who formed the “leading six” just 20km in.

Missing in action today was Daryl Impey, who was attending his brother’s wedding, as well as Louis Meintjes and 2016 Road Race Champion Jaco Venter, who withdrew due to illness.

Long into the race was when de Bod took off and was soon joined by Janse van Rensburg.

Another hot topic on the day was Willie Smit, who not only was part of the initial breakaway group of six riders, but also came across the line in third place to claim the bronze medal and his second podium at the championship.

“The team was phenomenal today. We had a plan in the morning and I think the race pretty much went to plan,” said Janse van Rensburg
“Everything worked out really well. Guys like Willie Smit were very impressive today, it’s good to see the local guys coming through. But I’m very very happy to take this jersey to Europe,” he concluded.

The u23 title was claimed by De Bod, with Nicholas Dlamini grabbing the silver medal and Morne van Niekerk coming over the line in third.  “It was amazing team work out there today,” said De Bod. “It was windy and it’s not exactly a route that suits me, so I’m pretty happy to have pulled it off. I knew I just had to go full gas and see who follows me. In the end it worked out very well.”

In the 128.7km U19 Men’s race, Jason Oosthuizen finished in first place ahead of Devin Shortt in second and third placed Ryan Terry.

“It was tough at the beginning of the race, because having won the time trial, and having defending champion Devin Shortt there – the guys know that we were strong so they weren’t letting us get away,” said Oosthuizen.

With three laps to go after catching the main break Oosthuizen said that it was just a defending game until the end. “With 150m to go I just put my head down and did what I needed to do,” he said.

SUMMARY OF RESULTS FROM SA NATIONAL ROAD CHAMPS – DAY 6 – 12 February 2017

Road Race

Elite Men

1. Reinhardt Janse van Rensburg 4:33:11:272
2. Stefan de Bod 4:33:11.668
3. Willie Smit 4:34:35.151

U23 Men

1. Stefan de Bod 4:33:11.668
2. Nicholas Dlamini 4:43:36.649
3. Morne van Niekerk 4:43:36.715

U19 Men

1. Jason Oosthuizen 3:56:05.301
2. Devin Shortt 3:56:05.466
3. Ryan Terry 3:56:05.697